NORTH CENTRAL PROVINCE

 

 

Kaudulla National Park

Kaudulla Wewa (Lake)

 

Minneriya National Park, Kaudulla National Park
These two national parks are located close to each other. The closest towns are Polonnaruwa and Higurakgoda. Within these parks lie the elephant corridors and these majestic animals could be viewed right around the year. During the month of August when the surrounding areas get hit by the drought, the elephant gathering in the world could be viewed. With the October rains, they drift back to their normal habitats. The area is also a heaven for bird lovers.

 

Kawudulla Wewa
Kawudulla Wewa, also known as the “Thissawaddamana Vapi” or “Ranthisa Wewa” was constructed by King Mahasena. Acccording to the chronicles, both King Vijayabahu (1055-1110) and King Parakramabahu the Great, (1153-1186) respectively had carried out rehabilitation work on the tank which was formed by building a bund across Kaudulu Oya.
It receives water along the Elahera-Kantale Giant Canal which begins at the Elahera Anicut on the Amban Ganga, built by King Vasabha. Gal Oya and Aluth Oya are two natural water reservoirs located in Kaudulla Wewa. Kaudulla Tank is a good place for bird watching.

 

Hurulu Wewa

Hurulu Wewa

 

The Hurulu Wewa was previously known as “The Challura Vapi” built by King Mahasena.

The more recent rehabilitation work was undertaken in the 1940’s. According to records of the Irrigation Department, the tank was filled for the first time after restoratyion on 10th July 1949. Although the work was completed in 1953, the Great Flood in 1957 washed away the bund of Hurulu Wewa. The second phase of Hurulu wewa was completed in 1958.
It is located at an elevation of 124 meters above sea level.

Kala-Balalu Wewa

Kala-Balalu Wewa

 

There were extensive irrigation systems all over the island, each designed to suit a particular terrain. The best known of these is the north central province system and Kala Balalu Wewa that at spill level is nearly seven square miles. Contour channels conduct the water to and from the tanks. Four canals distribute water from the Kala-balalu wewa. One of them, the Jaya river, took the water to Anuradhapura and onwards. Large tanks were connected to one another by trans-basin canals. These trans-basins or ‘yoda elas’ fed tanks along the way. They were also used for transport.

Kala Wewa (Lake)

Kala Wewa (Lake)

 

Kala Wewa in Anuradhapura is one of the country’s most magnificent reservoirs and was, in past ages, known as “The lifeblood of Irrigation”, a captivating masterpiece built by King Dhatusena around 400 AD. This reservoir has a circumference of 40 miles (64.4 km) and a total surface area of 7 square miles (18.1 km) at full capacity.

 

 

 

 

 

Amban Ganga (River)

Amban GangaAmban Ganga has been one of the main irrigation systems and main tributaries of the Mahaweli River. As a result, in the dry zone emerged three major complex irrigation systems, i.e. Malwathu Oya-Kala Oya, Mahaweli-Amban Ganga and Walawe-Kirindi Oya.
Today, Sri Lanka has 59 giant tanks spread out in 13 districts of the dry zone irrigating the nation’s paddy lands. Among the largest ancient tanks are Parakrama Samudra, Minneriya Tank, Kaudulla Tank & Kantalai Tank with gross capacities of 109,000 Ac. ft, 110,000 Ac. ft, 104,000 Ac. ft. and 114,000 Ac. ft.
The largest modern tank is the Senanayake Samudra with a gross capacity of 770,000 Ac. ft.

 

Minneriya National Park

 Minneriya National Park

 

Minneriya National Park, Kaudulla National Park
These two national parks are located close to each other. The closest towns are Polonnaruwa and Higurakgoda. Within these parks lie the elephant corridors and these majestic animals could be viewed right around the year. During the month of August when the surrounding areas get hit by the drought, the elephant gathering in the world could be viewed. With the October rains, they drift back to their normal habitats. The area is also a heaven for bird lovers.