Worlds End

Worlds End

 

Second Worlds End – Passara

When we talk of World’s End in Sri Lanka we immediately think of the cloud shrouded forest, Horton Plains and its breathtaking precipice. The 2nd World’s End is not that well known but it gives an equally panoramic view. This vista could be reached traveling up to Passara from Badulla and then turning on to the Madolsima road and traveling a distance of about 38kms. The climate here is rather warm compared to the cool climes of Horton Plains. The distant sentinel Namunukula, the highest mountain in the area whose peak is covered with mist, is a treat to the eyes. The site is right next to Roeberry Estate. As the plantation has quite a lot of minor roads, inquiries will have to be made from the plantation workers because of the absence of adequate signage. It’s quite convenient as the World’s End here is motorable up to the point. besides, the absence of very thick mist here offers a clear view of the spectacular drop into an endless ravine covered in thick jungle growth. Few awesome sights in the world can really compare with this expanse of sheer beauty. A point further up looks very inviting but the herds of wild oxen there make it rather dangerous to venture too far out there. There are 2 viewing points named Big World’s End and Small World’s End. Both offer equally awesome views. The sad story is that many travelers come to Sri Lanka and visit only a few hot spots and miss many of the wonders of nature this land is full of. The second World’s End too is a place that’s much in demand by the environmentalist in particular.

 

Devil’s Staircase
If it’s an adventurous trek you are looking for in Sri Lanka the right choice would be Devils Staircase just below the Worlds End in the famous Horton Plains. You’d have to be a tad unlucky if you don’t make it up this forbidding drive, but an expert driver can see you through to the top and back with not much sweat. Take the upper road to reach it traveling down off the Boralanda–Horton Plains road via Udaveriya Plantation. Turning off at Kalupahana on the Colombo–Badulla highway this point could be reached passing the highest waterfall, Bambarakanda, either driving or trekking up. Only a good 4-wheel vehicle can negotiate this steep road and the drive is up a very narrow track. Obviously one needs a very good driver at the wheel on this trip. At times the track gets very badly muddied up due to constant rain in the region and the route has to be trekked. A few sign boards still remain along the track, stodgy anachronisms which are a reminder of the reliability trials conducted by the British for riders who dared to drive up Devil’s Staircase which is the closest thing to suicide in paradise the writer has encountered. Happily, no one has in recent decades come-a-cropper on this drive. A special mention on this journey is the spot known to the mountain folk as the “Double Cut”. It’s a steep incline with three bends, one on top of the other, chiseled in to the mountain. Anyone driving up this terrain has no time to change gears or reverse. The whole stretch has to be negotiated in one breath. One miscalculation could bring life to a sudden ‘finis’. The views from here are fantastic with herds of elk and curtains of mist which waft and follow in that nether region like the spirits of fairies in the air. One feels that one is within touching distance of heaven here. This is an experience that is really off the beaten track and a challenge every tourist relishes.

 

 

Worlds End

Great World’s End Drop